Member Directory: G

Dan Kvitka

Terri is an artist who has been working with kiln formed glass since 2010. She works from her home studio in rural Washington state, USA. Having spent 20 years as an emergency physician, Terri has always been interested in the human form and finds continual inspiration in the strength of the human spirit. Her works are an exploration of this theme. Terri has been honored to have her piece, 'Kathryn' selected as a finalist in the 2014 Bullseye Emerge competition. Her most recently completed work is 'Natalie'.
www.terrigrant.net

(photo: Jamie Gray)

Jamie Gray is a glass artist who makes work on and about the Canadian prairies, focusing on issues of identity in a post-colonial culture. She is currently pursuing an MFA at the Edinburgh College of Art.

Wallpiece for Nokia UK Headquarters
Carole Gray

I use many of the traditional techniques practised by stained glass artists over the centuries, to create work which is highly contemporary. I specialise in using decorative techniques in my work, including sandblasting, gilding, plating, false leading, kiln-fired paints and stains.

Vertabra Screen
Steve Wragg/David Green

24 years glass making experience. Rejoined the fold after an hiatus of 9 years teaching FE Art & Design. Moving away from small gallery piece to larger scale architectural work. Having previously been a BAG committee member I am reacquainting myself with glass by doing an MA at the University of Wolverhampton.

Jellyfish

Joanne works in traditional leaded glass and more contemporary glassworking techniques including fusing, screenprinting, sandblasting and engraving.Inspired by the natural world, her work draws upon the beauty and mystery often overlooked in everyday life.

Photo: Simon Bruntnell

My move from fine art to studio glass began at London Glass Blowing in 1994 where in subsequent years I became a freelance curator specialising in glass jewellery and glass art exhibitions. In 2004 I was introduced to Nulife Glass’ unique furnace technology that recycles the glass from older style televisions, otherwise known as cathode ray tubes or CRTs. The process extracts metallic lead from the CRT glass and with my background in the creative sector and glass, I have collaborated with many artists to develop new products from the recycled material.

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